Vitamania

Vitamania Author Rima Dombrow Apple
ISBN-10 0813522781
Release 1996
Pages 245
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"Have you taken your vitamins today?" That question echoes daily through American households. Thanks to intensive research in nutrition and medicine, the importance of vitamins to health is undisputed. But millions of Americans believe that the vitamins they get in their food are not enough. Vitamin supplements have become a multibillion-dollar industry. At the same time, many scientists, consumer advocacy groups, and the federal Food and Drug Administration doubt that most people need to take vitamin pills. Vitamania tells how and why vitamins have become so important to so many Americans. Rima Apple examines the claims and counterclaims of scientists, manufacturers, retailers, politicians, and consumers from the discovery of vitamins in the early twentieth century to the present. She reveals the complicated interests--scientific, professional, financial--that have propelled the vitamin industry and its would-be regulators. From early advertisements linking motherhood and vitamin D, to Linus Pauling's claims for vitamin C, to recent congressional debates about restricting vitamin products, Apple's insightful history shows the ambivalence of Americans toward the authority of science. She also documents how consumers have insisted on their right to make their own decisions about their health and their vitamins. Vitamania makes fascinating reading for anyone who takes--or refuses to take--vitamins. It will be of special interest to students, scholars, and professionals in public health, the biomedical sciences, history of medicine and science, twentieth-century history, nutrition, marketing, and consumer studies.



Vitamania

Vitamania Author Catherine Price
ISBN-10 9780698192218
Release 2015-02-24
Pages 336
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"A hidden, many-faceted, and urgent story." --Booklist, *STARRED* Most of us know nothing about vitamins. What’s more, what we think we know is harming both our personal nutrition and our national health. By focusing on vitamins at the expense of everything else, we’ve become blind to the bigger picture: despite our belief that vitamins are an absolute good—and the more of them, the better—vitamins are actually small and surprisingly mysterious pieces of a much larger nutritional puzzle. In Vitamania, award-winning journalist Catherine Price offers a lucid and lively journey through our cherished yet misguided beliefs about vitamins, and reveals a straightforward, blessedly anxiety-free path to enjoyable eating and good health. When vitamins were discovered a mere century ago, they changed the destiny of the human species by preventing and curing many terrifying diseases. Yet it wasn’t long before vitamins spread from labs of scientists into the realm of food marketers and began to take on a life of their own. By the end of the Second World War, vitamins were available in forms never before seen in nature—vitamin gum, vitamin doughnuts, even vitamin beer—and their success showed food manufacturers that adding synthetic vitamins to otherwise nutritionally empty products could convince consumers that they were healthy. The era of “vitamania,” as one 1940s journalist called it, had begun. Though we’ve gained much from our embrace of vitamins, what we’ve lost is a crucial sense of perspective. Vitamins may be essential to our lives, but they are not the only important substances in food. By buying into a century of hype and advertising, we have accepted the false idea that particular dietary chemicals can be used as shortcuts to health—whether they be antioxidants or omega-3s or, yes, vitamins. And it’s our vitamin-inspired desire for effortless shortcuts that created today’s dietary supplement industry, a veritable Wild West of overpromising “miracle” substances that can be legally sold without any proof that they are effective or safe. For the countless individuals seeking to maximize their health and who consider vitamins to be the keys to well-being, Price’s Vitamania will be a game-changing look into the roots of America’s ongoing nutritional confusion. Her travels to vitamin manufacturers and food laboratories and military testing kitchens—along with her deep dive into the history of nutritional science— provide a witty and dynamic narrative arc that binds Vitamania together. The result is a page-turning exploration of the history, science, hype, and future of nutrition. And her ultimate message is both inspiring and straightforward: given all that we don’t know about vitamins and nutrition, the best way to decide what to eat is to stop obsessing and simply embrace this uncertainty head-on. By exposing our extraordinary psychological rela¬tionship with vitamins and challenging us to question our beliefs, Vitamania won’t just change the way we think about vitamins. It will change the way we think about food. From the Hardcover edition.



Vitamania

Vitamania Author Daniel Bernardi
ISBN-10 UOM:39015047088680
Release 1996
Pages 378
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'Vitamania' tells how and why vitamins have become so important to so many Americans. Apple examines the claims and counterclaims of scientists, manufacturers, retailers, politicians, and consumers from the discovery of vitamins in the early twentieth century to the present.



Nutritionism

Nutritionism Author Gyorgy Scrinis
ISBN-10 9780231527149
Release 2013-05-28
Pages 368
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Popularized by Michael Pollan in his best-selling In Defense of Food, Gyorgy Scrinis’s concept of nutritionism refers to the reductive understanding of nutrients as the key indicators of healthy food—an approach that has dominated nutrition science, dietary advice, and food marketing. Scrinis argues this ideology has narrowed and in some cases distorted our appreciation of food quality, such that even highly processed foods may be perceived as healthful depending on their content of “good” or “bad” nutrients. Investigating the butter versus margarine debate, the battle between low-fat, low-carb, and other weight-loss diets, and the food industry’s strategic promotion of nutritionally enhanced foods, Scrinis reveals the scientific, social, and economic factors driving our modern fascination with nutrition. Scrinis develops an original framework and terminology for analyzing the characteristics and consequences of nutritionism since the late nineteenth century. He begins with the era of quantification, in which the idea of protective nutrients, caloric reductionism, and vitamins’ curative effects took shape. He follows with the era of good and bad nutritionism, which set nutricentric dietary guidelines and defined the parameters of unhealthy nutrients; and concludes with our current era of functional nutritionism, in which the focus has shifted to targeted nutrients, superfoods, and optimal diets. Scrinis’s research underscores the critical role of nutrition science and dietary advice in shaping our relationship to food and our bodies and in heightening our nutritional anxieties. He ultimately shows how nutritionism has aligned the demands and perceived needs of consumers with the commercial interests of food manufacturers and corporations. Scrinis also offers an alternative paradigm for assessing the healthfulness of foods—the food quality paradigm—that privileges food production and processing quality, cultural-traditional knowledge, and sensual-practical experience, and promotes less reductive forms of nutrition research and dietary advice.



Fear of Food

Fear of Food Author Harvey Levenstein
ISBN-10 9780226473741
Release 2012-03-08
Pages 218
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A food historian reveals the people and interests that have created and exploited food worries over the years, questioning these "experts" in order to free Americans from the fears that cloud our food choices.



Paradox of Plenty

Paradox of Plenty Author Harvey A. Levenstein
ISBN-10 9780195089189
Release 1994
Pages 337
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America has always been blessed with an abundance of food, but when it comes to the national diet, it is a land of stark contrast and paradox. In the early months of the Depression, for instance, there were 82 breadlines in New York City alone, and food riots broke out in such places as Henryetta, Oklahoma, and England, Arkansas. Yet at the same time, among those who were better-off, absurd weight-loss diets were the rage - the Pineapple-and-Lamb-Chop Diet, the "Mayo Diet" of raw tomatoes and hard-boiled eggs, and even a Coffee-and-Donuts Diet. Why do Americans eat what they eat? And why, in a land of plenty, do so many eat so poorly? In Paradox of Plenty, Harvey Levenstein offers a sweeping social history of food and eating in America, exploring the economic, political, and cultural factors that have shaped the American diet from 1930 to the present. Levenstein begins with the Great Depression, describing the breadlines and the slim-down diets, the era's great communal eating fests - the picnics, barbecues, fish fries, and burgoo feasts - and the wave of "vitamania" which swept the nation before World War II, breeding fears that the national diet was deficient in the so-called "morale vitamin." He discusses wartime food rationing and the attempts of Margaret Mead and other social scientists to change American eating habits, and he examines the postwar "Golden Age of American Food Processing," when Duncan Hines and other industry leaders convinced Americans that they were "the best-fed people on Earth." He depicts the disillusionment of the 1960s, when Americans rediscovered hunger and attacked food processors for denutrifying the food supply, and he shows how President Kennedy helped revive the mystique of French food (and how Julia Child helped demystify it). Finally, he discusses contemporary eating habits, the national obsession with dieting, cholesterolphobia, "natural" foods, the demographics of fast-food chains, and the expanding role of food processors as a source of nutritional information. Both colorful and informative, Paradox of Plenty is the sequel to Levenstein's highly acclaimed Revolution at the Table, which chronicled American eating habits from 1880 to 1930. With this volume he establishes his reputation as the leading historian of the American diet.



Candy

Candy Author Samira Kawash
ISBN-10 9780374711108
Release 2013-10-15
Pages 416
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For most Americans, candy is an uneasy pleasure, eaten with side helpings of guilt and worry. Yet candy accounts for only 6 percent of the added sugar in the American diet. And at least it's honest about what it is—a processed food, eaten for pleasure, with no particular nutritional benefit. So why is candy considered especially harmful, when it's not so different from the other processed foods, from sports bars to fruit snacks, that line supermarket shelves? How did our definitions of food and candy come to be so muddled? And how did candy come to be the scapegoat for our fears about the dangers of food? In Candy: A Century of Panic and Pleasure, Samira Kawash tells the fascinating story of how candy evolved from a luxury good to a cheap, everyday snack. After candy making was revolutionized in the early decades of mass production, it was celebrated as a new kind of food for energy and enjoyment. Riding the rise in snacking and exploiting early nutritional science, candy was the first of the panoply of "junk foods" that would take over the American diet in the decades after the Second World War—convenient and pleasurable, for eating anytime or all the time. And yet, food reformers and moral crusaders have always attacked candy, blaming it for poisoning, alcoholism, sexual depravity and fatal disease. These charges have been disproven and forgotten, but the mistrust of candy they produced has never diminished. The anxiety and confusion that most Americans have about their diets today is a legacy of the tumultuous story of candy, the most loved and loathed of processed foods.Candy is an essential, addictive read for anyone who loves lively cultural history, who cares about food, and who wouldn't mind feeling a bit better about eating a few jelly beans.



Darm mit Charme

Darm mit Charme Author Giulia Enders
ISBN-10 9783843707114
Release 2014-02-28
Pages 288
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Der Millionen-Bestseller jetzt aktualisiert — mit einem Zusatzkapitel über neue wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse Unser Darm ist ein fabelhaftes Wesen voller Sensibilität, Verantwortung und Leistungsbereitschaft. Wenn man ihn gut behandelt, bedankt er sich dafür. Das tut jedem gut: Der Darm trainiert zwei Drittel unseres Immunsystems. Aus Brötchen oder Tofu-Wurst beschafft er unserem Körper die Energie zum Leben. Und er hat das größte Nervensystem nach dem Gehirn. Allergien, unser Gewicht und eben auch unsere Gefühlswelt sind eng mit unserm Bauch verknüpft. In diesem Buch erklärt die junge Wissenschaftlerin Giulia Enders, was die medizinische Forschung Neues bietet und wie wir mit diesem Wissen unseren Alltag besser machen können. Die dazu gehörigen Illustrationen stammen aus der Feder ihrer Schwester Jill. Die aktualisierte Neuauflage wird um ein Kapitel ergänzt: Die Schwestern Enders geben hier ein Update zu neuen Forschungsergebnissen und der Welt der Mikroben.



Das kleine Buch vom achtsamen Leben

Das kleine Buch vom achtsamen Leben Author Patrizia Collard
ISBN-10 9783641190293
Release 2016-08-08
Pages 96
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Wie schön wäre es, einfach ganz entspannt im Hier und Jetzt zu leben. Das endlose Gedankenkarussell für einen Moment anzuhalten und der Hektik des Alltags zu entkommen. Dafür müssen Sie nicht stundenlang auf dem Meditationskissen sitzen: Die einfachen Achtsamkeitsübungen in diesem Buch führen Sie in Minutenschnelle zu innerer Klarheit, Gelassenheit und Ruhe. Probieren Sie es aus – gönnen Sie sich kleine Auszeiten, die den Tag entschleunigen und den Kopf freimachen.



Lichtduschen

Lichtduschen Author Niklaus Ingold
ISBN-10 9783034012768
Release 2017-02-07
Pages 280
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In the interwar period, western health experts considered ultraviolet light a powerful means for stimulating the population. In Germany, the electrical industry started to sell sunlamps for daily use, while hygienists and the spokesmen of the health reform movement celebrated the health effects of "light showers" in the popular press. Based on a careful reading of a wide variety of scientific and popular texts, the book maps the functions of sunlight in western medicine and culture. It studies the history of light and heliotherapy in medicine and investigates the transition of medical practices towards a marketed consumer product. The book argues that the electrification of light therapy shaped a new rationale for the application of light on the human body in medicine and beyond at the start of the 20th century.



Naturwissenschaft

Naturwissenschaft Author Natalie Angier
ISBN-10 9783641042097
Release 2010-06-23
Pages 448
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Standardwerk über die modernen Naturwissenschaften Naturwissenschaft ist cool, lustvoll und sehr aufregend. Die renommierte Wissenschaftsjournalistin ist überzeugt, dass es Spaß macht, die Sprache unseres Körpers zu verstehen, etwas vom Kleinsten und vom Größten zu wissen oder sich das gewaltige Heizkraftwerk Erde unter unseren Füßen vorstellen zu können. Wissenschaft ist keine Festung aus Fakten, sondern ein dynamischer Prozess, gespeist aus Neugier und Entdeckerfreude. Menschen mit naturwissenschaftlichem Basiswissen begreifen unseren Alltag besser und können genauere Fragen stellen, z. B. zu Klimawandel oder Gentechnik. Das Buch lädt ein zu einer kurzweiligen Tour durch die abenteuerliche Welt des Wissens: leicht verständlich, amüsant und spannend wie ein Krimi.



Nationalizing the Body

Nationalizing the Body Author Projit Bihari Mukharji
ISBN-10 9780857289957
Release 2010-12-03
Pages 368
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This book seeks to move emphasis away from the over-riding importance given to the state in existing studies of ‘western’ medicine in India, and locates medical practice within its cultural, social and professional milieus. Based on Bengali doctors writings this book examines how various medical problems, challenges and debates were understood and interpreted within overlapping contexts of social identities and politics on the one hand, and their function within a largely unregulated medical market on the other.



Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Author
ISBN-10 CORNELL:31924066900832
Release 1871
Pages
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Index of archaeological papers published in 1891, under the direction of the Congress of Archaeological Societies in union with the Society of Antiquaries.



A Movable Feast

A Movable Feast Author Kenneth F. Kiple
ISBN-10 9781139463546
Release 2007-04-30
Pages
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Pepper was once worth its weight in gold. Onions have been used to cure everything from sore throats to foot fungus. White bread was once considered too nutritious. From hunting water buffalo to farming salmon, A Movable Feast chronicles the globalization of food over the past ten thousand years. This engaging history follows the path that food has taken throughout history and the ways in which humans have altered its course. Beginning with the days of hunter-gatherers and extending to the present world of genetically modified chickens, Kenneth F. Kiple details the far-reaching adventure of food. He investigates food's global impact, from the Irish potato famine to the birth of McDonald's. Combining fascinating facts with historical evidence, this is a sweeping narrative of food's place in the world. Looking closely at geographic, cultural and scientific factors, this book reveals how what we eat has transformed over the years from fuel to art.



Controversies in Food and Nutrition

Controversies in Food and Nutrition Author Myrna Chandler Goldstein
ISBN-10 0313317879
Release 2002
Pages 260
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Independent scholar Myrna and adolescent medicine specialist Mark (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) have collaborated on two previous books. Here they have selected a number of issues about food and nutrition that seem to be of high public concern, and summarize the various positions on them. For each, they suggest topics for discussion, and list books, periodicals, and organizations where more information is available.



Eating History

Eating History Author Andrew F. Smith
ISBN-10 9780231140935
Release 2011
Pages 376
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Food expert and celebrated food historian Andrew F. Smith recounts--in delicious detail--the creation of contemporary American cuisine. The diet of the modern American wasn't always as corporate, conglomerated, and corn-rich as it is today, and the style of American cooking, along with the ingredients that compose it, has never been fixed. With a cast of characters including bold inventors, savvy restaurateurs, ruthless advertisers, mad scientists, adventurous entrepreneurs, celebrity chefs, and relentless health nuts, Smith pins down the truly crackerjack history behind the way America eats. Smith's story opens with early America, an agriculturally independent nation where most citizens grew and consumed their own food. Over the next two hundred years, however, Americans would cultivate an entirely different approach to crops and consumption. Advances in food processing, transportation, regulation, nutrition, and science introduced highly complex and mechanized methods of production. The proliferation of cookbooks, cooking shows, and professionally designed kitchens made meals more commercially, politically, and culturally potent. To better understand these trends, Smith delves deeply and humorously into their creation. Ultimately he shows how, by revisiting this history, we can reclaim the independent, locally sustainable roots of American food.



Polio Wars

Polio Wars Author Naomi Rogers
ISBN-10 9780199334131
Release 2013-10-18
Pages 488
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During World War II, polio epidemics in the United States were viewed as the country's "other war at home": they could be neither predicted nor contained, and paralyzed patients faced disability in a world unfriendly to the disabled. These realities were exacerbated by the medical community's enforced orthodoxy in treating the disease, treatments that generally consisted of ineffective therapies. Polio Wars is the story of Sister Elizabeth Kenny -- "Sister" being a reference to her status as a senior nurse, not a religious designation -- who arrived in the US from Australia in 1940 espousing an unorthodox approach to the treatment of polio. Kenny approached the disease as a non-neurological affliction, championing such novel therapies as hot packs and muscle exercises in place of splinting, surgery, and immobilization. Her care embodied a different style of clinical practice, one of optimistic, patient-centered treatments that gave hope to desperate patients and families. The Kenny method, initially dismissed by the US medical establishment, gained overwhelming support over the ensuing decade, including the endorsement of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (today's March of Dimes), America's largest disease philanthropy. By 1952, a Gallup Poll identified Sister Kenny as most admired woman in America, and she went on to serve as an expert witness at Congressional hearings on scientific research, a foundation director, and the subject of a Hollywood film. Kenny breached professional and social mores, crafting a public persona that blended Florence Nightingale and Marie Curie. By the 1980s, following the discovery of the Salk and Sabin vaccines and the March of Dimes' withdrawal from polio research, most Americans had forgotten polio, its therapies, and Sister Kenny. In examining this historical arc and the public's process of forgetting, Naomi Rogers presents Kenny as someone worth remembering. Polio Wars recalls both the passion and the practices of clinical care and explores them in their own terms.