The Myth of Achievement Tests

The Myth of Achievement Tests Author James J. Heckman
ISBN-10 9780226100128
Release 2014-01-14
Pages 472
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Achievement tests play an important role in modern societies. They are used to evaluate schools, to assign students to tracks within schools, and to identify weaknesses in student knowledge. The GED is an achievement test used to grant the status of high school graduate to anyone who passes it. GED recipients currently account for 12 percent of all high school credentials issued each year in the United States. But do achievement tests predict success in life? The Myth of Achievement Tests shows that achievement tests like the GED fail to measure important life skills. James J. Heckman, John Eric Humphries, Tim Kautz, and a group of scholars offer an in-depth exploration of how the GED came to be used throughout the United States and why our reliance on it is dangerous. Drawing on decades of research, the authors show that, while GED recipients score as well on achievement tests as high school graduates who do not enroll in college, high school graduates vastly outperform GED recipients in terms of their earnings, employment opportunities, educational attainment, and health. The authors show that the differences in success between GED recipients and high school graduates are driven by character skills. Achievement tests like the GED do not adequately capture character skills like conscientiousness, perseverance, sociability, and curiosity. These skills are important in predicting a variety of life outcomes. They can be measured, and they can be taught. Using the GED as a case study, the authors explore what achievement tests miss and show the dangers of an educational system based on them. They call for a return to an emphasis on character in our schools, our systems of accountability, and our national dialogue. Contributors Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin–Madison Andrew Halpern-Manners, Indiana University Bloomington Paul A. LaFontaine, Federal Communications Commission Janice H. Laurence, Temple University Lois M. Quinn, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Pedro L. Rodríguez, Institute of Advanced Studies in Administration John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities



The Myth of Achievement Tests

The Myth of Achievement Tests Author James J. Heckman
ISBN-10 022632480X
Release 2015-09-04
Pages 468
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Achievement tests play an important role in modern societies. They are used to evaluate schools, to assign students to tracks within schools, and to identify weaknesses in student knowledge. The GED is an achievement test used to grant the status of high school graduate to anyone who passes it. GED recipients currently account for 12 percent of all high school credentials issued each year in the United States. But do achievement tests predict success in life? The Myth of Achievement Tests shows that achievement tests like the GED fail to measure important life skills. James J. Heckman, John Eric Humphries, Tim Kautz, and a group of scholars offer an in-depth exploration of how the GED came to be used throughout the United States and why our reliance on it is dangerous. Drawing on decades of research, the authors show that, while GED recipients score as well on achievement tests as high school graduates who do not enroll in college, high school graduates vastly outperform GED recipients in terms of their earnings, employment opportunities, educational attainment, and health. The authors show that the differences in success between GED recipients and high school graduates are driven by character skills. Achievement tests like the GED do not adequately capture character skills like conscientiousness, perseverance, sociability, and curiosity. These skills are important in predicting a variety of life outcomes. They can be measured, and they can be taught. Using the GED as a case study, the authors explore what achievement tests miss and show the dangers of an educational system based on them. They call for a return to an emphasis on character in our schools, our systems of accountability, and our national dialogue. Contributors Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin–Madison Andrew Halpern-Manners, Indiana University Bloomington Paul A. LaFontaine, Federal Communications Commission Janice H. Laurence, Temple University Lois M. Quinn, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Pedro L. Rodríguez, Institute of Advanced Studies in Administration John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities



The Myth of Achievement Tests

The Myth of Achievement Tests Author James J. Heckman
ISBN-10 022610009X
Release 2014-01-09
Pages 472
Download Link Click Here

Achievement tests play an important role in modern societies. They are used to evaluate schools, to assign students to tracks within schools, and to identify weaknesses in student knowledge. The GED is an achievement test used to grant the status of high school graduate to anyone who passes it. GED recipients currently account for 12 percent of all high school credentials issued each year in the United States. But do achievement tests predict success in life? The Myth of Achievement Tests shows that achievement tests like the GED fail to measure important life skills. James J. Heckman, John Eric Humphries, Tim Kautz, and a group of scholars offer an in-depth exploration of how the GED came to be used throughout the United States and why our reliance on it is dangerous. Drawing on decades of research, the authors show that, while GED recipients score as well on achievement tests as high school graduates who do not enroll in college, high school graduates vastly outperform GED recipients in terms of their earnings, employment opportunities, educational attainment, and health. The authors show that the differences in success between GED recipients and high school graduates are driven by character skills. Achievement tests like the GED do not adequately capture character skills like conscientiousness, perseverance, sociability, and curiosity. These skills are important in predicting a variety of life outcomes. They can be measured, and they can be taught. Using the GED as a case study, the authors explore what achievement tests miss and show the dangers of an educational system based on them. They call for a return to an emphasis on character in our schools, our systems of accountability, and our national dialogue. Contributors Eric Grodsky, University of Wisconsin–Madison Andrew Halpern-Manners, Indiana University Bloomington Paul A. LaFontaine, Federal Communications Commission Janice H. Laurence, Temple University Lois M. Quinn, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Pedro L. Rodríguez, Institute of Advanced Studies in Administration John Robert Warren, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities



The Myths of Standardized Tests

The Myths of Standardized Tests Author Phillip Harris
ISBN-10 9781442208117
Release 2011-01-16
Pages 206
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Pundits, politicians, and business leaders continually make claims for what standardized tests can do, and those claims go largely unchallenged because they are in line with popular assumptions about what these tests can do, what the scores mean, and the psychology of human motivation. But what most of what these opinion leaders say-and the public believes-about standardized testing just isn't so. However, few members of the general public, not even concerned parents, have the time or the background to keep up with the latest findings of testing experts, psychometricians, and researchers. That's where The Myths of Standardized Tests comes in. In simple, accessible language, Harris, Smith, and Harris spell out the assumptions underlying standardized tests and point out what's true about them and what's just plain mythical. But they not only debunk common assumptions; they propose better ways to judge the success of our schools. They also offer readers suggestions for ways they can help reduce the burden of tests on their children. Appendixes offer readers contact information and suggestions for actions they can take to become part of the solution to the problem of overusing and misusing standardized tests.



The Myth of Black Anti Intellectualism A True Psychology of African American Students

The Myth of Black Anti Intellectualism  A True Psychology of African American Students Author Kevin O. Cokley
ISBN-10 9781440831577
Release 2014-11-11
Pages 131
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Why do students who belong to racial minority groups—particularly black students—fall short in school performance? This book provides a comprehensive and critical examination of black identity and its implications for black academic achievement and intellectualism. • Uses African American identity as the framework to understand academic achievement and to expose the biases of "deficit thinking" that presumes that under-achievement among black students is related to deficiencies in motivation, intelligence, culture, or socialization • Presents information and viewpoints informed by empirical research in a manner that is accessible to general readers and non-specialists • Uses personal anecdotes and examples from popular culture to connect with readers and better illustrate the validity of the author's strengths-based approach rather than the conventional deficit-based approach • Challenges the idea that black students are inherently anti-intellectual and do not value school as much as their non-black peers



50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America s Public Schools

50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America s Public Schools Author David C. Berliner
ISBN-10 9780807755242
Release 2014
Pages 260
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50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America s Public Schools has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from 50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America s Public Schools also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full 50 Myths and Lies That Threaten America s Public Schools book for free.



The Genius in All of Us

The Genius in All of Us Author David Shenk
ISBN-10 9780385532655
Release 2010-03-09
Pages 288
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Is true greatness obtainable from everyday means and everyday genes? Conventional wisdom says no, that a lucky few are simply born with certain gifts. The new science of human potential suggests otherwise. Forget everything you think you know about genes, talent, and intelligence, and take a look at the amazing new evidence. Here, interweaving cutting-edge research from numerous scientific fields, David Shenk offers a new view of human potential, giving readers more of a sense of ownership over their accomplishments, and freeing parents from the bonds of genetic determinism. As Shenk points out, our genes are not a “blueprint” that dictate individual destinies. Rather we are all the product of interplay between genes and outside stimuli—a dynamic that we can influence. It is a revolutionary and life-changing message.



Connecting in College

Connecting in College Author Janice M. McCabe
ISBN-10 9780226409528
Release 2016-11-08
Pages 234
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Many college students rely on their friends for more than just having fun. But surprisingly, we know very little about what college students friendships look like, or how they might benefit from these friendships, socially and academically, in the short and long term. At a time when only four out of ten students graduate from four-year colleges within four years, understanding friendships may help better assist students and institutions in drawing on friends benefits and avoiding their pitfalls. In this book, sociologist Janice McCabe explores how friendship networks matter for college students lives both during and after college. In doing so, she identifies different types of friendship networksfor instance, the extent to which young people have tight cohesive friendship groups, or move effortlessly through different social circlesand how these networks are associated with social and academic success for students from different race, gender, and class backgrounds. The benefits of friendship are not the same for all friends, and these benefits also are not the same for all students; McCabe finds instead that friendship network type influences how friends matter for students academic and social successes and failures."



The Myth of the Rational Voter

The Myth of the Rational Voter Author Bryan Caplan
ISBN-10 9781400828821
Release 2011-08-15
Pages 296
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The greatest obstacle to sound economic policy is not entrenched special interests or rampant lobbying, but the popular misconceptions, irrational beliefs, and personal biases held by ordinary voters. This is economist Bryan Caplan's sobering assessment in this provocative and eye-opening book. Caplan argues that voters continually elect politicians who either share their biases or else pretend to, resulting in bad policies winning again and again by popular demand. Boldly calling into question our most basic assumptions about American politics, Caplan contends that democracy fails precisely because it does what voters want. Through an analysis of Americans' voting behavior and opinions on a range of economic issues, he makes the convincing case that noneconomists suffer from four prevailing biases: they underestimate the wisdom of the market mechanism, distrust foreigners, undervalue the benefits of conserving labor, and pessimistically believe the economy is going from bad to worse. Caplan lays out several bold ways to make democratic government work better--for example, urging economic educators to focus on correcting popular misconceptions and recommending that democracies do less and let markets take up the slack. The Myth of the Rational Voter takes an unflinching look at how people who vote under the influence of false beliefs ultimately end up with government that delivers lousy results. With the upcoming presidential election season drawing nearer, this thought-provoking book is sure to spark a long-overdue reappraisal of our elective system.



The Testing Charade

The Testing Charade Author Daniel Koretz
ISBN-10 9780226408712
Release 2017-08-31
Pages 283
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In this new book, Dan Koretz, the US's leading expert in educational testing and measurement, openly names the failures caused by our testing policies. He documents some of the most egregious misuses and outright abuses of testing that have been imposed in the name of accountability, and he explains--and concretely illustrates--some of the most serious negative effects. Test-based accountability has led teachers to waste time on all manner of undesirable test preparation, for example, teaching children tricks to answer multiple-choice questions or ways to game the tests' scoring rubrics. Testing and test preparation have therefore displaced a sizeable share of actual instruction, in a school year that is already short by international standards. Test-based accountability has led to a corruption of the ideals of teaching. In an apparently increasing number of cases, it has led to manipulation of the tested population (for example, findings ways to keep low achievers from being tested) and outright cheating, some instances of which have led to criminal charges and even imprisonment. And it has created gratuitous and often enormous stress for educators, parents, and most important, students. Koretz is not arguing here that test-based accountability has been a total failure. There have been a few positive effects, but they are paltry compared to the varied and severe harms it has caused. Though the evidence of these failures has been accumulating for more than twenty years, it is routinely ignored--in the design of educational programs, in public reporting of educational "progress," and in decisions about the fates of schools, students, and educators. Dan Koretz has written this book so that the evidence can no longer be overlooked.



The Myth of measurability

The Myth of measurability Author Paul L. Houts
ISBN-10 UOM:49015000627399
Release 1975
Pages 398
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The Myth of measurability has been writing in one form or another for most of life. You can find so many inspiration from The Myth of measurability also informative, and entertaining. Click DOWNLOAD or Read Online button to get full The Myth of measurability book for free.



The War Against Boys

The War Against Boys Author Christina Hoff Sommers
ISBN-10 9781439126585
Release 2013-08-20
Pages 288
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An updated and revised edition of the controversial classic—now more relevant than ever—argues that boys are the ones languishing socially and academically, resulting in staggering social and economic costs. Girls and women were once second-class citizens in the nation’s schools. Americans responded w ith concerted efforts to give girls and women the attention and assistance that was long overdue. Now, after two major waves of feminism and decades of policy reform, women have made massive strides in education. Today they outperform men in nearly every measure of social, academic, and vocational well-being. Christina Hoff Sommers contends that it’s time to take a hard look at present-day realities and recognize that boys need help. Called “provocative and controversial . . . impassioned and articulate” (The Christian Science Monitor), this edition of The War Against Boys offers a new preface and six radically revised chapters, plus updates on the current status of boys throughout the book. Sommers argues that the problem of male underachievement is persistent and worsening. Among the new topics Sommers tackles: how the war against boys is harming our economic future, and how boy-averse trends such as the decline of recess and zero-tolerance disciplinary policies have turned our schools into hostile environments for boys. As our schools become more feelings-centered, risk-averse, competition-free, and sedentary, they move further and further from the characteristic needs of boys. She offers realistic, achievable solutions to these problems that include boy-friendly pedagogy, character and vocational education, and the choice of single-sex classrooms. The War Against Boys is an incisive, rigorous, and heartfelt argument in favor of recognizing and confronting a new reality: boys are languishing in education and the price of continued neglect is economically and socially prohibitive.



Giving Kids a Fair Chance

Giving Kids a Fair Chance Author James J. Heckman
ISBN-10 9780262019132
Release 2013
Pages 137
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In Giving Kids a Fair Chance, Nobel Prize-winning economist James Heckman argues that the accident of birth is the greatest source of inequality in America today. Children born into disadvantage are, by the time they start kindergarten, already at risk of dropping out of school, teen pregnancy, crime, and a lifetime of low-wage work. This is bad for all those born into disadvantage and bad for American society. Current social and education policies directed toward children focus on improving cognition, yet success in life requires more than smarts. Heckman calls for a refocus of social policy toward early childhood interventions designed to enhance both cognitive abilities and such non-cognitive skills as confidence and perseverance. This new focus on preschool intervention would emphasize improving the early environments of disadvantaged children and increasing the quality of parenting while respecting the primacy of the family and America's cultural diversity. Heckman shows that acting early has much greater positive economic and social impact than later interventions -- which range from reduced pupil-teacher ratios to adult literacy programs to expenditures on police -- that draw the most attention in the public policy debate. At a time when state and local budgets for early interventions are being cut, Heckman issues an urgent call for action and offers some practical steps for how to design and pay for new programs. The debate that follows delves deeply into some of the most fraught questions of our time: the sources of inequality, the role of schools in solving social problems, and how to invest public resources most effectively. Mike Rose, Geoffrey Canada, Charles Murray, Carol Dweck, Annette Lareau, and other prominent experts participate.



The Myth of the Spoiled Child

The Myth of the Spoiled Child Author Alfie Kohn
ISBN-10 9780807073889
Release 2016-03
Pages 280
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Originally published in hardcover in 2014.



Contradictions of School Reform

Contradictions of School Reform Author Linda M. McNeil
ISBN-10 0415920736
Release 2000
Pages 304
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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.



Reign of Error

Reign of Error Author Diane Ravitch
ISBN-10 9780385350891
Release 2013-09-17
Pages 416
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From one of the foremost authorities on education in the United States, former U.S. assistant secretary of education, “whistle-blower extraordinaire” (The Wall Street Journal), author of the best-selling The Death and Life of the Great American School System (“Important and riveting”—Library Journal), The Language Police (“Impassioned . . . Fiercely argued . . . Every bit as alarming as it is illuminating”—The New York Times), and other notable books on education history and policy—an incisive, comprehensive look at today’s American school system that argues against those who claim it is broken and beyond repair; an impassioned but reasoned call to stop the privatization movement that is draining students and funding from our public schools. ​In Reign of Error, Diane Ravitch argues that the crisis in American education is not a crisis of academic achievement but a concerted effort to destroy public schools in this country. She makes clear that, contrary to the claims being made, public school test scores and graduation rates are the highest they’ve ever been, and dropout rates are at their lowest point. ​She argues that federal programs such as George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and Barack Obama’s Race to the Top set unreasonable targets for American students, punish schools, and result in teachers being fired if their students underperform, unfairly branding those educators as failures. She warns that major foundations, individual billionaires, and Wall Street hedge fund managers are encouraging the privatization of public education, some for idealistic reasons, others for profit. Many who work with equity funds are eyeing public education as an emerging market for investors. ​Reign of Error begins where The Death and Life of the Great American School System left off, providing a deeper argument against privatization and for public education, and in a chapter-by-chapter breakdown, putting forth a plan for what can be done to preserve and improve it. She makes clear what is right about U.S. education, how policy makers are failing to address the root causes of educational failure, and how we can fix it. ​For Ravitch, public school education is about knowledge, about learning, about developing character, and about creating citizens for our society. It’s about helping to inspire independent thinkers, not just honing job skills or preparing people for college. Public school education is essential to our democracy, and its aim, since the founding of this country, has been to educate citizens who will help carry democracy into the future.



The School and Society The Child and the Curriculum

The School and Society   The Child and the Curriculum Author John Dewey
ISBN-10 9780486122106
Release 2012-03-07
Pages 128
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The two short, influential books represent the earliest authoritative statement of the famed educator's revolutionary emphasis on education as an experimental, child-centered process. 4 halftones and 4 charts.